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Recovery

LA County Announces Nail Salons, Spas, Tattoo Shops, Casinos, Bars and Wineries Reopening with Safeguards 1024 634 COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES

LA County Announces Nail Salons, Spas, Tattoo Shops, Casinos, Bars and Wineries Reopening with Safeguards

LA County Announces Nail Salons, Spas, Tattoo Shops, Casinos, Bars and Wineries Reopening with Safeguards

Los Angeles County is moving forward in its Roadmap to Recovery by reopening additional personal and recreational services to residents including nail salons, bars and casinos.

Although overall case counts are increasing as testing becomes more widespread and there is more community transmission, the County continues to see steady decreases in the rate of COVID-19 infections and virus-related hospitalizations and deaths.

Today, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (Public Health) announced that the Health Officer Order will be modified to include infection control and distancing requirements for re-opening the following sectors on Friday, June 19:

  • Nail salons
  • Cosmetology services
  • Spas offering aesthetic and massage services
  • Tattoo and piercing shops
  • Tanning salons
  • Casinos, card rooms and satellite wagering sites
  • Bar and wineries not anchored to food services

These businesses will be able to open, in some cases at limited capacity, once they have the appropriate infection control and distancing requirements in place.

In addition, protests and faith-based services held outdoors will no longer have limits on how many people can participate, starting Friday.

Public health guidance documents will be posted here as soon as they are available: publichealth.lacounty.gov/media/Coronavirus.

The County continues to actively monitor the spread of the virus and the capacity of the healthcare system to provide residents with essential services. COVID-19 is still present in Los Angeles County, and the threat of this deadly virus remains.

However, the County is in line with State of California guidelines, and our key metrics reflect that compliance. Los Angeles County’s seven-day death average has not increased, the three-day hospitalization average is down five percent and the seven-day testing average is well above the State’s requirement at 17,000 tests conducted per day.

In addition, the positivity rate is eight percent, which is in line with the State’s requirements.

Detailed data and metrics on the reopening guidelines can be found here.

Los Angeles County remains in Phase 3 of the State’s Resilience Roadmap.

Residents must continue to practice physical distancing, wear cloth face coverings and follow Public Health directives.

If at any time the County’s rate of infection and other key metrics demonstrate a rapid acceleration of new cases that threatens to overwhelm the healthcare system, the Public Health and the Board of Supervisors may need to limit future re-openings or close reopened sectors.

Getting a manicure, a massage or a tattoo, or going to a card room will be a different experience than it was before the pandemic. Each sector reopening will have strict infection control directives in place.  Please see below for highlights from each sector.

Just as is required for all out-of-home activities, visitors and staff will have to practice physical distancing and wear cloth face coverings. There will be limited capacity and enhanced cleaning and disinfecting procedures. People feeling sick should stay home.

These additional re-openings follow other significant elements of the economy and community that have begun reopening and operating with limits and safeguards, including gyms, day camps, museums, spectator-free sports, hair salons, barber shops, religious services, retail, restaurants, beaches and trails.

Still closed are movie theaters, live performance theaters, entertainment centers, concert halls and venues, stadiums, arenas, gaming facilities, theme parks, lounges and nightclubs, hot tubs, steam rooms and saunas not located on a residential property and festivals. Click here for a detailed list of what is currently open and closed in L.A. County.

Click here for frequently asked questions by residents about resuming the use of previously closed sectors.

The plans for reopening are part of a phased progression that provides residents, employees and customers with safety protections to slow the spread of COVID-19.

###

At a Glance: Highlights of the Guidelines for Reopening

  • All employees and customers will be screened for symptoms, including cough and fever. Anyone feeling unwell should stay home.
  • Customers must wear a face covering at all times, unless exempted for a particular service.
  • Physical distancing must be maintained and capacity will be limited.
  • Waiting rooms will be limited or closed and amenities, such as magazines, will be removed.
  • Reservations are required for personal services.
  • Contactless forms of payments are encouraged.

Additional information for individual sectors:

Nail Services

  • Staff must wear a cloth face covering at all times. Staff may be required to wear a respirator, which is necessary when ventilation is insufficient to reduce exposure below permissible exposure limits established in state code.
  • For certain procedures workers may need to wear, in addition to their face covering, a face shield and gloves.
  • You may not receive multiple services, for example a manicure and a pedicure, at the same time.
  • Reservations are required.

Esthetician, Skin Care, Electrolysis and Cosmetology Services

  • Customers must wear face coverings at all times while in the facility, except when the face covering must be removed for the performance of services involving that part of the face.
  • In addition to face coverings, staff are required to wear a face shield when they are providing services that do not enable the client to wear a face covering. Staff should also wear disposable gloves throughout the entire esthetic service.

Massage Services

  • Staff must wash their hands before any services are provided.
  • Customers must wear face coverings during the entirety of the massage service.
  • Hand treatments will be provided as the last part of the service.

Tattoo and Piercing Services

  • Gloves are required throughout the tattoo and piercing sessions.
  • Mouth/nose area piercings and tattooing are suspended.

Card rooms

  • Occupancy is limited to 50%, and food and beverages are only allowed at restaurants and bars.

Bars and wineries

  • Bars and wineries may serve only alcohol and the establishment does not need to be affiliated with food services, as the previous order required.
  • Customers will not be able to order drinks at the bar or counter.
  • Capacity is limited to 50% and customers will need to be seated to order and consume beverages.

No entertainment is allowed.

At a Glance: Highlights of the Guidelines for Reopening

Gyms and fitness facilities

  • Employees and customers will be screened for symptoms, including cough and fever. Gym-goers feeling unwell should reschedule their appointment.
  • Staff must wear a cloth face covering at all times.
  • Gym-goers must wear a cloth face covering when entering and exiting the gym and it is recommended that they be worn while exercising in the gym.
  • Physical distancing must be maintained and equipment may be rearranged to allow for that.
  • Reservations for time at the gym are recommended as occupancy will be limited.
  • Equipment must be cleaned before and after each use with provided disinfecting wipes or the gym must provide “ready to clean” tags for staff to clean equipment after each use.
  • Personal trainers must maintain six feet of distance from their clients and wear a face covering. Clients are strongly encouraged to wear a face covering while receiving instruction
  • Group training class sizes will be limited to ensure a minimum of six feet of physical distance between patrons. Group exercise classes can only be offered if distancing requirements can be maintained and there is no person to-person physical contact.
  • High contact programs that require close contact less than six feet in distance are not allowed.
  • Pools at fitness facilities may reopen once employees properly clean and disinfect for use in accordance with Center for Disease Control guidelines.
  • Saunas, steam rooms and hot tubs remain closed.

Day camps

  • Employees and campers will be screened for symptoms, including fever. Each campers’ temperature will be taken before camp begins. Campers feeling unwell should stay home.
  • Physical distancing measures will be in place.
  • Staff must wear cloth face coverings and campers are encouraged to wear cloth face coverings.
  • Outdoor activities are encouraged
  • Campers should bring their own meals, when possible.

Museums, galleries, zoos and aquariums

  • Interactive exhibits will be closed.
  • Capacity will be limited.
  • Tours and live presentations in confined areas, such as an animal show, must only include members of the same household.

Campgrounds, RV parks and outdoor recreation

  • Plan ahead. Make reservations and purchase permits, firewood, ice and other items online or by phone before arriving on site.
  • Be prepared to be as self-contained and self-sufficient as possible. Bring everything you may need, including soap, cleaning supplies, hand sanitizer, paper towels/hand towels, and toilet paper. Bring your own sports equipment, towels, first aid supplies, and other items needed for outdoor recreation, whenever possible.
  • Visitors should bring plastic tablecloths for picnic tables that can be disposed of or taken back home for washing.
  • Set up your campsite or picnic areas with maximum distance from adjacent campsites and picnic sites that host people from different households.
  • Many programs and facilities will be canceled or closed, so visitors should check online resources for updated information about rule changes and closures to know what to expect upon arrival. Playgrounds and other common spaces will be closed.
  • Leave furniture, such as picnic tables and chairs, where they were found as park staff may have appropriately spaced these items to encourage physical distancing.
  • Pack up what you pack in to keep campsite staff safe.

Professional sports without live audiences

  • All staff will be required to wear masks, follow physical distancing guidelines and be screened for symptoms before work.
  • Athletes and staff must not have had signs or symptoms of COVID-19 in the past 14 days or close contact with anyone who is sick within 14 days of beginning group training.
  • Athletes must wear face coverings at all times other than while exercising.
  • Physical distancing should be practiced to the extent possible on the field/in-game play and in training, though guidelines may be adjusted subject to limitations of competition and the fundamentals of certain sports.
  • Broadcasters will have to practice physical distancing and camera placements will be different than pre-COVID-19.

Hotels, lodging and short-term rentals for tourism and individual travel)

  • Employees, including housekeeping, must wear face coverings and limit touching guests’ belongings.
  • Guests will be screened for symptoms. People experiencing symptoms will not be allowed an overnight stay. Guests who feel sick should not travel or stay in a hotel.
  • Stringent cleaning and laundry protocols will be in place to protect staff and guests.
  • Reusable materials in rooms, such as magazines, menus and local attraction details, will be removed.
  • Rooms should be left vacant 24 to 72 hours after a guest has departed for proper cleaning.
  • In the event of a presumptive case of COVID-19, the guest’s room will be removed from service and quarantined. In the event of a positive case, the room should only be returned to service after undergoing a deep cleaning in accordance with Center for Disease Control guidelines.
  • Property managers, timeshare operators, and other rental unit owners and operators must only rent unoccupied units and cannot rent rooms or spaces within an occupied residence.
  • Saunas, steam rooms, and hot tubs will remain closed.
From Gyms and Day Camps to Spectator-Free Professional Sports and Museums, L.A. County Moves to Reopen Key Sectors 1024 683 COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES

From Gyms and Day Camps to Spectator-Free Professional Sports and Museums, L.A. County Moves to Reopen Key Sectors

From Gyms and Day Camps to Spectator-Free Professional Sports and Museums, L.A. County Moves to Reopen Key Sectors

*Visit nhmlac.org for more information about planned reopening.*

Los Angeles County is moving forward on the Roadmap to Recovery and reopening key economic and community sectors, including day camps, fitness centers, spectator-free professional sports, museums, campgrounds and entertainment production.

In the most comprehensive reopening since strict public health guidelines were put in place in March, today the Los Angeles Department of Public Health announced that the Health Officer Order will be modified tomorrow to include infection control and distancing requirements for re-opening the following sectors on June 12:

  • Gyms and fitness facilities
  • Professional sports without live audiences
  • Day camps
  • Museums, galleries, zoos and aquariums
  • Campgrounds, RV parks and outdoor recreation
  • Music, film and television production
  • Hotels, lodging and short-term rentals for tourism and individual travel

The County continues to monitor the spread of the virus and the capacity of the healthcare system to provide residents with essential services.

With these reopenings, Los Angeles County will be in Phase 3 of the State’s Resilience Roadmap.

However, this major step forward does not mean the threat of COVID-19 is gone. Residents must continue to practice physical distancing, wear cloth face coverings and follow public health directives.

If at any time, the County’s rate of infection and other key metrics demonstrate a rapid acceleration of new cases that threatens to overwhelm the healthcare system, the Department of Public Health and the Board of Supervisors may need to limit future re-openings or close reopened sectors.

Going to the gym, visiting a museum or going to camp will be very different than it was before the pandemic. Each sector reopening will have strict infection control directives in place.

Just as is required for all out-of-home activities, visitors and staff will have to practice physical distancing and wear cloth face coverings. There will be limited capacity and enhanced cleaning and disinfecting procedures. People feeling sick should stay home

These additional re-openings follow other significant elements of the economy and community that have begun reopening and operating with limits and safeguards, including hair salons, barber shops, religious services, retail, restaurants, beaches and trails.

Still closed are nail salons, tattoo shops, bars and wineries, movie theaters, live performance theaters, entertainment centers, concert halls and venues, stadiums, arenas, gaming facilities, theme parks and festivals. Click here for a detailed list of what is open and closed in L.A. County.

Los Angeles County is still under a Safer At Work And In The Community order and public and private gatherings of people outside of a single household unit are not permitted except for public protests and faith-based services.

Everyone must continue to follow physical distancing and infection control protocols and wear a cloth face covering when in contact with others not from your household.

The plans for reopening are part of a phased progression that provides residents, employees and customers with safety protections to slow the spread of COVID-19.

At a Glance: Highlights of the Guidelines for Reopening

Gyms and fitness facilities

  • Employees and customers will be screened for symptoms, including cough and fever. Gym-goers feeling unwell should reschedule their appointment.
  • Staff must wear a cloth face covering at all times.
  • Gym-goers must wear a cloth face covering when entering and exiting the gym and it is recommended that they be worn while exercising in the gym.
  • Physical distancing must be maintained and equipment may be rearranged to allow for that.
  • Reservations for time at the gym are recommended as occupancy will be limited.
  • Equipment must be cleaned before and after each use with provided disinfecting wipes or the gym must provide “ready to clean” tags for staff to clean equipment after each use.
  • Personal trainers must maintain six feet of distance from their clients and wear a face covering. Clients are strongly encouraged to wear a face covering while receiving instruction
  • Group training class sizes will be limited to ensure a minimum of six feet of physical distance between patrons. Group exercise classes can only be offered if distancing requirements can be maintained and there is no person to-person physical contact.
  • High contact programs that require close contact less than six feet in distance are not allowed.
  • Pools at fitness facilities may reopen once employees properly clean and disinfect for use in accordance with Center for Disease Control guidelines.
  • Saunas, steam rooms and hot tubs remain closed.

Day camps

  • Employees and campers will be screened for symptoms, including fever. Each campers’ temperature will be taken before camp begins. Campers feeling unwell should stay home.
  • Physical distancing measures will be in place.
  • Staff must wear cloth face coverings and campers are encouraged to wear cloth face coverings.
  • Outdoor activities are encouraged
  • Campers should bring their own meals, when possible.

Museums, galleries, zoos and aquariums

  • Interactive exhibits will be closed.
  • Capacity will be limited.
  • Tours and live presentations in confined areas, such as an animal show, must only include members of the same household.

Campgrounds, RV parks and outdoor recreation

  • Plan ahead. Make reservations and purchase permits, firewood, ice and other items online or by phone before arriving on site.
  • Be prepared to be as self-contained and self-sufficient as possible. Bring everything you may need, including soap, cleaning supplies, hand sanitizer, paper towels/hand towels, and toilet paper. Bring your own sports equipment, towels, first aid supplies, and other items needed for outdoor recreation, whenever possible.
  • Visitors should bring plastic tablecloths for picnic tables that can be disposed of or taken back home for washing.
  • Set up your campsite or picnic areas with maximum distance from adjacent campsites and picnic sites that host people from different households.
  • Many programs and facilities will be canceled or closed, so visitors should check online resources for updated information about rule changes and closures to know what to expect upon arrival. Playgrounds and other common spaces will be closed.
  • Leave furniture, such as picnic tables and chairs, where they were found as park staff may have appropriately spaced these items to encourage physical distancing.
  • Pack up what you pack in to keep campsite staff safe.

Professional sports without live audiences

  • All staff will be required to wear masks, follow physical distancing guidelines and be screened for symptoms before work.
  • Athletes and staff must not have had signs or symptoms of COVID-19 in the past 14 days or close contact with anyone who is sick within 14 days of beginning group training.
  • Athletes must wear face coverings at all times other than while exercising.
  • Physical distancing should be practiced to the extent possible on the field/in-game play and in training, though guidelines may be adjusted subject to limitations of competition and the fundamentals of certain sports.
  • Broadcasters will have to practice physical distancing and camera placements will be different than pre-COVID-19.

Hotels, lodging and short-term rentals for tourism and individual travel)

  • Employees, including housekeeping, must wear face coverings and limit touching guests’ belongings.
  • Guests will be screened for symptoms. People experiencing symptoms will not be allowed an overnight stay. Guests who feel sick should not travel or stay in a hotel.
  • Stringent cleaning and laundry protocols will be in place to protect staff and guests.
  • Reusable materials in rooms, such as magazines, menus and local attraction details, will be removed.
  • Rooms should be left vacant 24 to 72 hours after a guest has departed for proper cleaning.
  • In the event of a presumptive case of COVID-19, the guest’s room will be removed from service and quarantined. In the event of a positive case, the room should only be returned to service after undergoing a deep cleaning in accordance with Center for Disease Control guidelines.
  • Property managers, timeshare operators, and other rental unit owners and operators must only rent unoccupied units and cannot rent rooms or spaces within an occupied residence.
  • Saunas, steam rooms, and hot tubs will remain closed.
L.A. County Reviews New State Guidelines That Could Move L.A. County Into Stage 3 of Roadmap to Recovery 1024 512 COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES

L.A. County Reviews New State Guidelines That Could Move L.A. County Into Stage 3 of Roadmap to Recovery

L.A. County Reviews New State Guidelines That Could Move LA County Into Stage 3 of Roadmap to Recovery

County seal superimposed on a photo of the Kenneth Hahn Hall of Administration

Los Angeles County is reviewing new guidelines from the State of California that could move LA County into Stage 3 of the Roadmap to Recovery and permit the reopening of key sectors including schools, day camps, museums, entertainment industry production, camping and spectator-free sporting events — as early as June 12.

The Department of Public Health will review the newly issued state guidance, evaluate the County’s COVID-19 metrics and data and consult with the Board of Supervisors to determine how sectors can re-open with safeguards and directives in place to ensure essential physical distancing and infection control.

At this time, Los Angeles County is still under a Safer At Work and In The Community Order. Public and private gatherings of people outside of a single household unit are not permitted except for public protests and faith-based services with limited numbers of participants.

Everyone needs to continue to follow physical distancing and infection control protocols and wear a cloth face covering when in contact with others not in your household.

At this time, still closed are:

  • Nail salons
  • Tattoo shops
  • Gyms and fitness centers
  • Campgrounds
  • Entertainment venues including arcades, bowling alleys, movie theaters, live performance theaters, concert halls, stadiums, arenas, theme parks, gaming facilities and festivals
  • Brewpubs, breweries, bars, pubs, craft distilleries, and wineries that do not offer sit-down, dine-in meals.
  • Indoor museums, galleries and zoos

Click here for a detailed list of what’s open and closed in L.A. County

The plans for reopening are part of a phased progression that provides employees, customers and residents with safety protections to slow the spread of COVID-19.

Hair Salons, Barbershops and In-person Dining to Reopen Immediately with Safeguards in Place 1024 665 COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES

Hair Salons, Barbershops and In-person Dining to Reopen Immediately with Safeguards in Place

Hair Salons, Barbershops and In-person Dining to Reopen Immediately with Safeguards in Place

Hair salons and barbershops can reopen and in-person dining in restaurants can resume immediately with safeguards as Los Angeles County moves forward on the Roadmap to Recovery.

The State of California today approved the County’s request for a variance to state guidelines because the County has met the necessary public health thresholds to safely allow critical sectors of the economy and community to begin serving residents.

The County has demonstrated that it has controlled the spread of the virus, and is protecting residents and essential workers. Hospital testing and contact tracing capacity are appropriate in response to the outbreak. Los Angeles County is now in the advanced stages of Phase 2 of the State’s Resilience Roadmap.

This new phase of Los Angeles County’s reopening better aligns the County with neighboring counties, moving Southern California towards a regional recovery and supporting our service-oriented businesses, many of which are small and locally owned It’s a testament to the efforts of residents who adhered to the Safer At Home order, practiced physical distancing and wore cloth face coverings.

“This is an important milestone for Los Angeles County as we transition to being Safer at Work and Safer in our Communities and move forward in our path of reopening and recovery,” said Supervisor Kathryn Barger, Chair of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors. “I am grateful to our state and local leaders for their partnership and collaboration in supporting the residents and businesses of Los Angeles County.”

However, this step forward doesn’t mean the threat of COVID-19 is gone. Residents must continue to practice physical distancing, wear cloth face coverings and follow public health guidelines in place.

If at any time, the County’s rate of infection and other key metrics return to unsafe numbers, the Department of Public Health can limit or close reopened sectors.

“We are only able to take this important step forward because everyone did their part. As we move along in our progress to reopen, let’s continue to keep our guard up. This highly contagious virus hasn’t disappeared; it is still out there, imposing a real threat to our communities. We cannot go back to business as usual,” said Supervisor Hilda L. Solis. “I urge everyone to continue doing their part by abiding by physical distancing and face covering requirements and by adhering to our new public health directives for reopened businesses. While our measure to reopen will provide economic relief to our workers and small businesses, extreme caution must be taken to prevent another spike in confirmed cases and fatalities. We must remember that our communities of color have been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19, and they will likely continue to bear the brunt if the coronavirus comes back with a vengeance.”

“This is a fine line that we’re walking in the County of Los Angeles, “said Supervisor Janice Hahn. “We are threading the needle between keeping the public safe and allowing our economy to reopen.”

“Small businesses are the lifeblood of our economy and we all should do our part to help them stay open safely,” Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas said. “But we are absolutely not out of the woods yet, so we must continue to protect our health and those of everyone around us. Following public health guidelines is critical as we go back to work, dine in at our favorite restaurants, and make that long-awaited trip to the barbershop or hair salon.”

“Like my colleagues I am happy that so many will return to work and familiar activities. Still, I cannot overemphasize the importance of the public’s role in making these next steps a success,” said Supervisor Sheila Kuehl. “People must continue to physically distance, wear face covers, and wash their hands often. If not, our cases and hospitalizations are likely to rise dramatically, forcing us to consider reducing access in order to protect public health.”

Dining in restaurants and getting a haircut will be a different experience than we’re used to. Just as is required for all out-of-home activities, clients and staff will have to practice physical distancing and wear cloth face coverings. There will be limited capacity and  enhanced cleaning and disinfecting procedures.

Key, specific guidelines for customers at hair salons, barbershops and in-person restaurant dining are below.

For a list of FAQs, click here.

Barbershops and hair salons

  • Physical distancing measures will be in place.
  • Employees and customers will be screened for symptoms, including cough and fever. Clients feeling unwell should reschedule their appointment.
  • Everyone, including clients, must wear cloth face coverings while in the salon or barber shop and clients are encouraged to wear face coverings with earloops to ensure the face covering does not interfere with the hair service.
  • Magazines, coffee and other amenities will not be available.
  • Clients are encouraged to use credit cards and contactless payment systems. If electronic or card payment is not possible, customers should come with exact cash payment or check, if available.
  • Stylists may only serve one client at a time.

For the detailed protocols visit: http://www.publichealth.lacounty.gov/media/coronavirus/.

Personal grooming that is still closed, or prohibited, at this time:

  • Nail salons
  • Spa services, including massage, facials and waxing

In-person dining in restaurants

  • Physical distancing measures will be in place.
  • Employees and customers will be screened for symptoms, including cough and fever. Patrons feeling unwell should not eat at a restaurant.
  • Outdoor seating and curbside pickup are prioritized.
  • Reservations will be encouraged.
  • Customers will be asked to wait for their table in their cars or outside the restaurant to prevent crowds from gathering.
  • Diners must wear cloth face coverings when not eating.
  • Bar areas will be closed.
  • Occupancy capacity will be limited to 60% for the next three weeks.

For the detailed protocol visit: http://www.publichealth.lacounty.gov/media/coronavirus/.

Los Angeles County is under a Safer At Work And In The Community order and public and private gatherings of people outside of a single household unit are not permitted except for public protests and faith-based services, which are permitted to operate with limits on the number of participants.

Everyone must continue to follow physical distancing and infection control protocols and wear a cloth face covering when in contact with others not in your household.

Still closed are:

  • Gyms and fitness centers
  • Beach piers
  • Indoor entertainment venues including arcades, bowling alleys, movie theaters, live performance theaters, concert halls, stadiums, arenas, theme parks, gaming facilities and festivals
  • Indoor museums, galleries and zoos
  • Click here for a detailed list of what’s open and closed in L.A. County

The new openings are part of a phased progression guiding the safe resumption of public life in Los Angeles County, including the resumption and reopenings that include: in-person faith-based services, in-store shopping at retail stores, bike paths, drive-in movies and other recreational pursuits. The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health will amend its Health Officer Order accordingly.

LA County moves toward sweeping new standards for swift and safe reopening, in alignment with state regulations 1024 665 COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES

LA County moves toward sweeping new standards for swift and safe reopening, in alignment with state regulations

LA County moves toward sweeping new standards for swift and safe reopening, in alignment with state regulations

In a major COVID-19 recovery milestone, Los Angeles County is moving toward new standards for a swift and safe reopening in alignment with the State of California guidelines. Among the activities now permitted under the change are faith-based services, in-store shopping at low-risk retail stores, drive-in movies and other recreational pursuits. 

In aligning its Health Officer orders with the state’s California Pandemic Resilience Roadmap, the County emphasized its commitment to keeping residents “safer at work and safer in our communities.”

The updated Health Officer Order, to be issued today by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, is part of a phased progression guiding the safe resumption of public life in Los Angeles County, including the recent reopening of beach bike paths and permission for car parades honoring graduates. 

The change also sets the stage for the County to request a variance from the state to permit swifter reopening of some sectors. 

Examples of activities now permitted under the changes enacted today:

  • Faith-based organizations may resume services, with the number of congregants limited to less than 25% of the building’s capacity, or a maximum of 100 people, whichever is lower.
  • All retail, including those located in indoor and outdoor retail shopping centers may now open for business at 50% capacity.
  • Flea markets, swap meets and drive-in movie theaters may resume operations.
  • Pools, hot tubs and saunas that are in a multi-unit residence or part of a homeowners association may now open. 

The Health Officer Order also provides guidelines for public protests. In-person protests are permitted as long as attendance is limited to 25% of the area's maximum occupancy, or a maximum of 100 attendees, whichever is lower.

The order emphasizes that physical distancing requirements, cloth face coverings and other safety protocols must be observed as the recovery progresses. 

“Aligning Los Angeles County’s health orders with that of the State’s is going to provide immediate relief to our communities. This important step will enable our residents and businesses to have greater clarity and consistency as we continue to take positive steps towards reopening Los Angeles County,” said Kathryn Barger, Chair of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors.  

“With the greenlight from Governor Newsom, people can go back inside our houses of worship and retail shops, with common sense guidelines in place,” said Supervisor Janice Hahn. “I am hopeful that we can continue to work with the Governor to restore life in Los Angeles County in safe, measured ways -- getting people back to work and doing everything within our own power to prevent the spread of this virus. 

“This is another big milestone for LA County as, step by step, we begin safely reopening our communities and economy,” Supervisor Hilda L. Solis said. “But reopening does not mean going back to business as usual. As long as community members follow safety rules, we can continue to make more progress. Our houses of worship can once again welcome people inside. Shopping malls and communal flea markets can get back to business. I am so proud of all the progress we’ve made to protect our loved ones from COVID-19. Given our resilience and collective sacrifice, we are ready to take the next step to reopen our economy.”

“Los Angeles County’s newest openings are crucial to communities throughout Los Angeles County,” Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas said. “As we push forward toward recovery, committing to an alignment with Governor Newsom’s plans, we also need to keep prioritizing the recovery of underserved and disadvantaged communities, including communities of color. The COVID-19 pandemic has shone a light on inequity in our health and housing systems; we now have a golden opportunity and obligation to chip away at these inequities. We must strive to make Los Angeles County stronger than it was before.”

Supervisor Sheila Kuehl said, “if you decide to go in person for a religious gathering or you must go to a store, be sure to wear your face covering. That’s an important way you are showing up for your family, friends and community. Without people’s willingness to wear face covers, practice physical distancing, and diligently follow public health guidelines, we will not be able to meet our goal of reopening as fully as possible as quickly as possible. I am happy to see us expand activities that people can engage in, but there is no way to overstate the importance of public cooperation in making this reopening work.” 

The updated order allows people to take part in all-permitted activities while continuing to practice physical distancing and wearing a cloth face covering when in contact with others. Although these updates are being enacted today, Los Angeles County residents are still encouraged to remain in their residences as much as practical and limit close contact with others outside their household both indoor and outdoor.

Gatherings of people not from the same household are still prohibited, except for faith-based services and in-person protests.

Additionally, people 65 years old or older and all people of any age with underlying health conditions should remain in their residences as much as possible. People in these categories should only leave their residences to seek medical care, exercise or obtain food or other necessities. Telework should continue as much as possible.

The County Public Health Department will continue to monitor COVID-19 data indicators closely and may, after consultation with the Board of Supervisors, adjust orders to reflect specific County needs.

More details are available here.

Memorial day new openings beach bike paths indoor mall curbside car parades 1024 674 COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES

Memorial day new openings beach bike paths indoor mall curbside car parades

As Memorial Day Weekend Approaches, L.A. County Announces New Openings of Beach Bike Paths, Indoor Mall Curbside Service, and Permission for Car Parades

Los Angeles County has announced three new openings in advance of the holiday weekend, allowing increased outdoor and retail activities for residents. Beach bike paths are now open, indoor malls can open for curbside service, and car parades will be allowed.

Beach Bike Paths and Parking Lots

The opening of bike paths follows the May 13 announcement that County beaches would be available for active recreation. Allowable recreation activities now include swimming, surfing, running, walking, skating, and biking.  Beach bathrooms remain open, and beach parking lots at Dockweiler State Beach, Will Rogers State Beach, Zuma Beach, and Surfrider Beach will be open at partial capacity. Santa Monica lots are closed, as are most public beach lots in coastal communities.

Safety protocols and additional information about beach visits include:

  • #BYOM—Bring your own mask. Everyone needs a face covering while out of the water if there are other people nearby. Infants and children under the age of 2 should not wear cloth face coverings.
  • Practice physical distancing. Stay at least six feet away from other people who are not in your household. Avoid crowded areas or crowding around others at the beach.
  • Gatherings of any size or other events are not allowed on the beaches including athletic competitions, youth camps, or recreational programming.
  • Chairs, umbrellas, canopies, coolers, and grills are not allowed.
  • Piers, volleyball courts, and boardwalks are closed except for the purpose of customers accessing retailers curbside and doorside and essential businesses along the boardwalk.
  • Concessions and food vending are not allowed. Bring what you may need with you.

More information on LA County beaches and parking lots can be found at beaches.lacounty.gov.

Indoor Shopping Malls

The County will also open indoor shopping malls for curbside service. Retail establishments and their customers must practice social distancing and wear face coverings, and the businesses must also be in compliance with the conditions laid out in this Checklist for Retail Establishments Opening for Curbside Pickup. It is recommended that shopping malls createclearly-marked curbside or outside pickup points that maintain physical distance with visual cues or other measures, and have purchased goods available there or available through home delivery. Retailers located within a mall may take orders and deliver goods to the public outside of the mall from these marked locations.

Car Parades

Car parades are now allowed so that graduations, birthdays and other special days and achievements can be safely celebrated. Car parades can not include participants on a bicycle, a motorcycle, a convertible with the top open, or a vehicle with no doors such as a golf cart. If any of the windows on a vehicle is open, the occupants of the vehicle must wear a face covering.

Any organization coordinating a large-scale parade must have a designated organizational host who is responsible for ensuring compliance with the rules for the parade and adherence to the State’s Stay At Home Order that precludes gatherings. Only those personnel of the organization necessary to facilitate the parade and to ensure compliance can be present at the location designated by the host.

The host must:

  • At its own cost, arrange for and provide security sufficient to ensure compliance with the State’s Order and address any traffic and safety issues.
  • Develop a parade plan that deals with State’s Order, traffic and safety issues, parade participants, and social distancing requirements.
  • Ensure participants and personnel adhere to the face covering and physical distancing requirements.
  • The host may provide a significant document to one vehicle parade participant at a time, such as a diploma or other paper, while adhering to face covering and social distancing requirements.

The parade must:

  • Take place in an outside location large enough to accommodate the social distancing requirements.
  • Proceed by the host’s invitation only, with the parade limit of vehicles tied to the capacity size of the location.
  • Not allow sales or exchanges of any items or food. **For clarification, “exchanges” ARE allowable for students to receive their diploma (i.e. would need to align with APPENDIX D: Protocol for Vehicle-Based Parades, especially #11 and #12 which make it clear how students may receive their diplomas)**
L.A. County Economic Resiliency Task Force Sets Sight on July 4 Reopening 1024 512 COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES

L.A. County Economic Resiliency Task Force Sets Sight on July 4 Reopening

L.A. County Economic Resiliency Task Force Sets Sight on July 4 Reopening

County seal superimposed on a photo of the Kenneth Hahn Hall of Administration

L.A. County’s Economic Resiliency Task Force is developing fast-track plans for economic reopening and recovery by July 4, as industry work groupsㅡin diverse areas ranging from bioscience, hospitality and education to sports, entertainment and the artsㅡforge ahead with concrete proposals for resuming operations safely.

The proposed timetable was unveiled during the task force’s second meeting, which was held today and included a presentation by the Los Angeles Economic Development Corporation that underscored the high stakes and urgency of the local economic situation as the COVID-19 crisis continues.

Bill Allen, president of the LAEDC, said there have been more than 1 million unemployment claims filed in L.A. County to date. More than 75% of the projected job losses are in positions earning an average of $50,000 a year or less, with restaurants and retail industries hit the hardest.

Los Angeles County Supervisor Barger, the task force chair, said a safe reopening is needed as soon as possible. “I understand the urgency to reopen and know many of the experts the County has assembled for this task force have been working hard to develop safe and efficient plans to revitalize their sectors as early as next month,” Barger said. “I remain focused on working with industry leaders and health officials to safely make way for Los Angeles County to reopen by the Fourth of July.”

The hearing included presentations from 13 industry representatives, who described the impacts of COVID-19 on their sectors. Jerry Greenberg, representing the restaurants/leisure/hospitality sector, reported that 80% of restaurant jobs have been lost. Pat Niemann, representing corporate business, discussed the consequences of reopening delays and the dangers of long-lasting unemployment. Donna Langley, film and entertainment representative, reported that the industry’s 890,000 film and entertainment employees were for the most part not working and noted that this unemployment trickled down to small business vendors as well.

Though each sector reported specific impacts, some common critical needs emerged in the meeting, including rapid but safe reopenings and customized guidance and health/safety protocols for sectors. Several members expressed the desire for new public-private partnerships and revenue streams to create jobs.

Los Angeles County Supervisor Hilda L. Solis, the task force’s vice chair, thanked the task force members and recommended using the LAEDC report as a roadmap for the work ahead. “It should spur discussion and guide us on what we face here in the County in all segments of our society, whether it’s education, healthcare, entertainment, workforce development, or safety for our employees,” she said. “We can move through this cautiously and expeditiously.”

Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas said that strategies for reopening should pay special attention to underserved and disadvantaged communities, including communities of color. “We can construct a much brighter future for all of us in Los Angeles County,” he said, “if we focus on equity and prosperity.”

Supervisor Sheila Kuehl noted the critical importance of public cooperation as we move closer to re-opening. “Our ability to re-open depends on a very high level of cooperation from the public. If it weren’t for the public’s willingness to practice social distancing, wear face covers and take necessary precautions, we would not be in a position to begin to plan a re-opening, and our ability to meet our goal of reopening as fully as possible as quickly as possible is dependent on each and every resident of this county doing their part to protect their own health, the health of their family and their community,” Kuehl said.

Supervisor Janice Hahn said it’s essential to get small businesses up and running. “The longer we stay closed in certain sectors, particularly small businesses and restaurants, the odds are that they will not be able to come back,” she said.  “I feel that we have to get to the point that we learn to live with the virus. We cannot stay locked down forever. My hope is that this task force will bring forth real plans for reopening these sectors that our Department of Public Health can agree on and present to the governor.”

The task force’s next meeting is scheduled for June 2.

Economic Resiliency Task Force Sector Representatives

  1. Arts and Culture: Tim Dang, USC
  2. Business - Corporate / Manufacturing: Pat Niemann, Ernst & Young
  3. Business - Small: Linda Griego, MLK Community Health Foundation and Griego Enterprises, Inc.
  4. Commodities / Goods Movement: Mario Cordero, Port of Long Beach
  5. Education: Dr. Barry Corey, Biola University
  6. Faith Organizations: Jackie DuPont-Walker, African Methodist Episcopal Church
  7. Film / Digital Media: Jeff Shell, NBCUniversal
  8. Foundations / Nonprofits: Regina Birdsell, Center for Nonprofit Management
  9. Healthcare / Bioscience: Dr. Hector Flores, Adventist Health White Memorial
  10. Infrastructure Development / Construction: Fran Inman, Majestic Realty
  11. Labor: Ron Herrera, LA County Federation of Labor
  12. Restaurants / Leisure / Hospitality: Jerry Greenberg, Sugarfish.
  13. Sports / Entertainment: Casey Wasserman, LA 2028

The Economic Resiliency Task Force was created by a board motion by Supervisors Barger and Solis, and unanimously adopted on April 28, 2020. A copy of that motion can be found here.

Los Angeles County Beaches Reopen For Active Recreation; Visitors Must Follow New Restrictions 1024 512 COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES

Los Angeles County Beaches Reopen For Active Recreation; Visitors Must Follow New Restrictions

Los Angeles County Beaches Reopen For Active Recreation; Visitors Must Follow New Restrictions

County seal superimposed on a photo of the Kenneth Hahn Hall of Administration

Los Angeles County announced the re-opening of its beaches as of May 13 for individual sports, exercise and similar physical activity. Permitted activities include walking, running, swimming and surfing. Face coverings are required at all times on the beach and around other people, unless in the water, and the county urges everyone to keep at least six feet of physical distancing from other visitors. Once finished with an activity, all beachgoers are asked to head home.

For now, parking lots, piers, boardwalks and biking paths will remain closed. Sunbathing, group sports, large gatherings, beach chairs, coolers and umbrellas are not allowed to help ensure proper physical distancing. If anyone headed to the beach feels sick or lives with someone who is sick, they are being asked to stay home.

Download LA County Lifeguard Pono Barnes Beach Reopening PSA in ENGLISH (Credit LA County): https://vimeo.com/417827870

Download LA County Lifeguard Marco Rodriguez Beach Reopening PSA in SPANISH (Credit LA County: https://vimeo.com/417828268

Download LA County Beach B-Roll (Credit LA County): HERE

Find beach rules here: beaches.lacounty.gov/la-county-beach-rules/

L.A. County Hiking Trails Reopen Saturday with Restrictions; B-roll and interview available for download 1024 512 COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES

L.A. County Hiking Trails Reopen Saturday with Restrictions; B-roll and interview available for download

L.A. County Hiking Trails Reopen Saturday with Restrictions

County seal superimposed on a photo of the Kenneth Hahn Hall of Administration

Hiking trails throughout Los Angeles County are set to reopen on Saturday, May 9. With the reopening comes a number of restrictions put in place to ensure everyone using the trail system remains as safe and healthy as possible.

Those enjoying the trails will need to observe at least six feet of physical distancing and wear a mask or face covering in all parking lots, trail heads, staging areas and crowded areas where it is not possible to maintain six feet of physical distancing. Masks or face coverings are only required on the trails if users cannot keep six feet of distancing between one another.

The Parks and Recreation Department is expecting the county’s most popular trails to be extremely busy this weekend and ask everyone to download the Trails LA County App or visit trails.lacounty.gov to find alternate trails to try in the area as well as view maps and see your current location on a trail.

Download B-roll and an interview with Alina Bokde, Deputy Director, Planning and Development Agency, Los Angeles County Parks & Recreation here (credit: LA County): https://vimeo.com/416513571/c4f1ba1466

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